Tag Archives: models

Stockholm 3D Printed

A 3D Printed Scale Model of the Entire City of StockholmArticle reposted from 3D Printing Newsletter, by Juho Vesanto On Tue, June 18, 2013.

Mitekgruppen, a Swedish scale-model company, created an almost exact replica of the city of Stockholm using Stratasys Dimension Series FDM 3D printers. Even though scaled down replicas of practically every major landmark — from the Golden Gate bridge to Big Ben — have been created with 3D printing tech before, bringing an entire city to life is quite a unique and remarkable feat: the created model of Stockholm is a full 157 square foot (scale 1:1000) in size. The Stockholm project used two Stratasys printers, running 24/7, seven days a week for six months before they finally fulfilled their remit and were given a vacation from their day & night job of creating the models.

Prior to the Stockholm project, originally commissioned in 2005 by the city, the company had been using only traditional means to create their models – paper, glue and wood combined with the blood, sweat and tears involved in manual, intricate labour. The fundamental reasons for tipping the scale to 3D printing’s side were the continuity and real-world reminiscent features of the commission – the model of the city was to be updated and revamped according to actual changes that take place in the infrastructure and city image every half a year. This meant that putting long hours into wood carving and other phases of the traditional process wasn’t an ideal or relevant approach to be used in this case.

Mitekgruppen 3D Printed Stockholm Coastal Detail Replica Stratasys

Jumping on the 3D printing train from the traditional methodologies wasn’t something that could be done overnight though – the physical, technical and mental factors, as well as changes in general attitude, approach and the operating model required a realistic transition phase. In Mitekgruppen’s case, that period lasted for a full nine months, during which time the project team took a crash course in CAD modelling, 3D printing tech, new SW and other required tools that would enable them to get the job done as efficiently and smoothly as humanly possible.

The effort the team put into learning the ropes of the 3D printing world didn’t go to waste even after finishing the base model of the city – the company currently starts every project with 3D printed models and prototypes, after which their current weapon of choice – a Stratasys Fortus 250mc – is also used to make some of the actual end-products in addition to other manufacturing techniques and technologies such as laser cutting and milling.

Mitekgruppen 3D Printed Stockholm Replica Stratasys

The model of Stockholm is currently not on display anywhere — but it is being prepared to be showcased in a yet undisclosed location (in Sweden of course).

Source: Stratasys blog

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The Smithsonian uses 3D printing to provide greater access to its collection

The Smithsonian Institute has started a new initiative to make its enormous collection more accessible. It includes a series of 3D printed models of its archive items and a digital archive of scanned objects. These could be exhibited at museums, schools and other places to enable more people to have access to them.

CNET reports that only 2% of the Smithsonian’s 137 million items is available to the public at any one time. That is why it is planning a digital archive of 3D models, which could then be printed and displayed to expand their reach.

As part of the project, RedEye On Demand recently created a 3D printed “museum-quality historical replica” of a Thomas Jefferson statue they had scanned, which was then installed for the “Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty” exhibit at the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The initiative has an ambitious goal but 3D digitization coordinators Adam Metallo and Vince Rossi are slowly building out the Smithsonian digital archive. Currently, only a few dozen objects can be scanned each year, some of which will be 3D printed while others will be digital 3D models. They hope that in the future there will be lots of 3D printed exhibits and models on display for everyone to enjoy.

Source: PSFK